Leadership & Followship

Is A Leader Born or Made?

On the back of our last posting covering the similarities between followership and leadership, this week we're going to take a brief look on the personal characteristics of a leader. A popular myth is that an effective leader is one who dominates and possesses high degrees of intelligence, confidence, initiative and limitless stamina. Even their height can be deemed a contributory factor. That is until we look at the physical stature of leaders like Napoleon or Gandi as well as the more infamous examples who turned the tides of history such as Hitler and Stalin.

Early theorists who supported these myths also assumed that leaders could only be born and not made whilst often forgetting that leadership characteristics can differ significantly. Take, for example, a general leading an army, a politician, a priest or team leader in a supermarket.

In running a small business, effective leadership embraces a number of factors:

1) Deliverables - this all about the goods and services. Things like quality control, customer satisfaction, competitive pricing and the numerous efficiencies that ultimately determine what is usually referred to as our business' bottom line.

2) People - an empathetic and considerate approach that leads to the motivation and job satisfaction of the team.

3) Education and coaching - linked closely with 2); these are the influences that govern our team players' growth in terms of knowledge and skill sets.

4) Values and culture - This ties together all of the story so far by being able to answer key questions, like exactly WHO we are, WHAT we are and WHY we do what we do. (If you're wondering about the 'HOW' and the 'WHEN', they usually sit in 1).

Think about this. In larger corporates, each of the categories above may come under the responsibility of a single executive with a CEO at the top whose job is to periodically run her or his thermometer across each of the 4 cells in order to report authoritatively (and hopefully with a few 'smileys' in tow) to shareholders and board members.

It's all a bit different in small business. An owner rarely has the luxury of being able to delegate these types of roles but rather embrace a little bit of everything themself and that's really the long and the short of it. Sound familiar?

In previous posts we've touched on a lot of things associated, directly or indirectly, with this topic. So, because of its importance, make no apology for any repetition. Indeed, we are confident, small business owner and writer, Susan Ward's take on leadership will help you on your journey, particularly the bit where she says, 'Leadership can be learned'. Enjoy the read.

Ted Beecher
BLA Director

Good Leaders Know How To Follow!

In Praise of Followers!

This is the title of a paper posted by Robert E.Kelley in the Harvard Business Review back in 1988 (Nov - Dec edition, pp 142-148).

The writer reminds business people of the emphasis we all place on leadership, and rightly so of course. He then quickly switches to the question of what about the people they lead? He cites Napoleon as being, without the support of his massive armies, ' merely a man with grandiose ambitions'. In the case of a business, Kelley states that they survive or fail partly on the basis of how well their leaders lead and partly how well their followers follow.

Recognising the importance of good followership, back in the last century when Jack Welch took over the reins of the massive, yet crippled, GE Corporation, he came up with an intriguing yet effective plan to save the Company. Put simply, it involved delegating responsibility by cutting through the many management layers and empowering those of the so-called lower echelons to make decisions which would collectively transform the organisation. In other words he created an army of effective followers.

Now hang on! I know BLA is all about small business, but don't be put off as the principles here can easily be applied in any size operation; even a one man band who is often a sort of leader/follower hybrid!

OK, back to Kelley. He explains that what distinguishes an effective from an ineffective follower is enthusiastic, intelligent and self-reliant participation - without star billing - in pursuit of an organisational goal. Culturally, self-confident followers see colleagues as allies, not competitors, and leaders as equals. Organisationally, more often than not, they can also see both the forest and the trees!

But how does the boss create this sort of environment? Simple!! (as that pesky meerkat would say!) Good leaders know how to follow and, in doings so, set an example for others.

By the way, do let us know if you want to know more about Jack Welch's pitch in the followership arena as we realise we barely scratched the surface by giving it the cursory air time above. In the meantime, here's another great article on the subject which hopefully will foster some practical tips on the roles of leaders and followers in the successful running of your business.

Ted Beecher
BLA Director