smartgoals

Forget Perfection - Get Something Down!

Unless you're a novelist (or blog-ist!), you'll be wondering what on earth has this topic got to do with running a business. Writers earn their living from using their gifting in the written word to create plots, twists, romance and all sorts of other page-turning tactics. The purpose here is to, not only get their readers to buy their books, but to share their 'take' on a particular tale with other fans of the author. After all, becoming a much talked-about writer is the obvious short cut to fame and fortune (especially if, later on, Netflix come knocking at the door!).

When the writer is impacted by what is known as 'Writer's Block', it's usually because he or she has run out of ideas, creativity or originality and struggles to put pen to paper. This can be de-motivating and, if allowed to fester, will have a negative impact on the writer's standing and, in the longer term, their bank balance.

The condition is so common in the literary world that the famous writer, George Orwell, wrote a novel called, Keep the Aspidistra Flying where the central character struggles to complete a poem about a day in London. It turned out to be too big for him and never really progressed having crumbled into a series of unconnected sub-stories. Now, doesn't that sound familiar when likened to all the different elements of running a small business?

Let's put it into the context of a new year and we're sitting down to articulate that dream plan that is going to bring in the results like we've never seen before. OK, we may be lucky but, chances are, we soon find ourselves stuck, just like the poor old writer staring into the ceiling and waving her pen around in frustration.

One particular literary practitioner's ideas about how the writer might address this is to give himself or herself permission to write rubbish . Yes, you heard it right, rubbish. Otherwise, they're as likely to be only focused on that masterpiece of perfection . Your rubbish may be that dream of a business plan. Whatever, type it into your phone, PC or write it down and put the timer on for 3 minutes using that time to add any other supporting rubbish.

Better still, this can be done in a group where everyone is given permission to go for the rubbish, no different from the time-honoured 'no holds barred' principles in brainstorming. After all it's well known how this can help a business move forward especially when embedded into its decision-making culture.

So what happens next? Despite sounding contradictory, rarely is this type of rubbish actually wasted. The writer's golden rule is to never dump any of your original writing in the WPB as, even though it might not be applicable now, it may come alive in another text later on. Likewise those pieces of rubbish that emerged from your business' brainstorming efforts may be anything but rubbish in another context at another time!

For the moment, however, you've as likely now got a collection of wild ideas and goals. Take each in turn and apply the SMART 'litmus test'. Are they?:

  • Specific

  • Measurable

  • Achievable

  • Relevant

Ted Beecher
BLA Director

Smart Goals & Know Roles

As businesses dealing with a world of constant change, we are now going to take a quick look at a couple of the things we need to embrace in order to remain truly effective. Let's dive into the important subject of goals and roles.

GOALS invariably sit at the top of the list of any good manager; also you'll get the same vibe if you talk to a change practitioner. Not surprisingly, therefore, much has been written about the subject. One of the most popular, well tried and tested theories is presented as the mnemonic, 'SMART'. What it simply tells us is that our goals need to be:

S=Specific
M =Measurable
A= Achievable
R=Relevant
T=Time bound

Here's an excellent link offering more detailed insight into this useful topic; please make sure you have a good read of it!

Moving on, let's ask ourselves about what our ROLE is in all of this? Even if we are a one-person-band, the interactions we have with our stakeholders are critical to the success of our business. So, here's a few pointers:

Networking skills - we need to establish the right contacts both internally and externally to our business, making them feel part of our decision making and goals.

Being champions of good communication, including listening, means we can effectively transmit and receive vital information which is important to our business.

Always foster ENTHUSIASM towards our planning and ideas to encourage participation, motivation and commitment. It also can be fun!

Remember to regularly hone those negotiating skills and other areas where influence is the key to getting things done.

From time to time pull back and then hover, yes, hover! This will give a 'Helicopter Perspective', taking us beyond our immediate focus and thus be able to spot new challenges and opportunities in good time. It also enables us to see what's working and what's not, things that we can easily miss when we get too absorbed in routine 'stuff'.

So there we have it for this week, a brief run-down on goal setting and some of the disciplines that will bring it to life and, in doing so, keep our businesses ahead of the pack!

Ted Beecher
BLA Director