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Is A Leader Born or Made?

On the back of our last posting covering the similarities between followership and leadership, this week we're going to take a brief look on the personal characteristics of a leader. A popular myth is that an effective leader is one who dominates and possesses high degrees of intelligence, confidence, initiative and limitless stamina. Even their height can be deemed a contributory factor. That is until we look at the physical stature of leaders like Napoleon or Gandi as well as the more infamous examples who turned the tides of history such as Hitler and Stalin.

Early theorists who supported these myths also assumed that leaders could only be born and not made whilst often forgetting that leadership characteristics can differ significantly. Take, for example, a general leading an army, a politician, a priest or team leader in a supermarket.

In running a small business, effective leadership embraces a number of factors:

1) Deliverables - this all about the goods and services. Things like quality control, customer satisfaction, competitive pricing and the numerous efficiencies that ultimately determine what is usually referred to as our business' bottom line.

2) People - an empathetic and considerate approach that leads to the motivation and job satisfaction of the team.

3) Education and coaching - linked closely with 2); these are the influences that govern our team players' growth in terms of knowledge and skill sets.

4) Values and culture - This ties together all of the story so far by being able to answer key questions, like exactly WHO we are, WHAT we are and WHY we do what we do. (If you're wondering about the 'HOW' and the 'WHEN', they usually sit in 1).

Think about this. In larger corporates, each of the categories above may come under the responsibility of a single executive with a CEO at the top whose job is to periodically run her or his thermometer across each of the 4 cells in order to report authoritatively (and hopefully with a few 'smileys' in tow) to shareholders and board members.

It's all a bit different in small business. An owner rarely has the luxury of being able to delegate these types of roles but rather embrace a little bit of everything themself and that's really the long and the short of it. Sound familiar?

In previous posts we've touched on a lot of things associated, directly or indirectly, with this topic. So, because of its importance, make no apology for any repetition. Indeed, we are confident, small business owner and writer, Susan Ward's take on leadership will help you on your journey, particularly the bit where she says, 'Leadership can be learned'. Enjoy the read.

Ted Beecher
BLA Director

Are You Ready For Change?

…'If it ain't broke don't fix it'
...'Don't change a winning team'
...'Don't change horses in mid-stream'

How often we see these kind of phrases and, let's face it, they can make pretty sound sense in their own right.

HOWEVER, when small business people like us stick with these WITHOUT taking regular temperature checks in our work and market places, things can come up and bite us (and invariably do when we least expect it!).

So, what should we do? Here's a few basics:

  • Talk regularly to customers in order to keep up to speed with the quality of our products, services and processes. Continually review their needs and draw intelligence from what is really going on their worlds, not just what we think might be.

  • Listen to suppliers on things like the effects of changing market trends or shifting environmental factors. Let's make them feel like we are true and curious stakeholders in their business (and them in ours, of course).

  • The same applies to our staff and, above all, keep them in the loop in an honest and open way. Not only does this engender team work but you never know what they pick up during the day which might have a major impact on the way we run our businesses.

Some people might refer to all this as simply risk management (an important subject for another time!); for others it's a natural default position founded on common sense and a hunger to make their businesses the best in the field.

Whatever we want to call it, one thing we can be sure, it creates READINESS for change. In other words it means we are ever alert; always on the starting blocks just waiting for that gun.

So how ready are you? To get some answers to this, just take a little time out to look at some of the questions you may need to ask yourself first.

Ted Beecher, BLA Director